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It’s a silver halide no-brainer for us

30.09.2014

Fujifilm hails a new golden era for silver halide paper

Fujifilm has pledged to boost its R&D investment in silver halide paper technology as increasing numbers of photographers opt to use it.

The company already has a leading market share with its Crystal Archive Paper range – but plans to increase production at its Tilburg, Holland manufacturing site, to cope with growing demand.

Peter Wigington, Fujifilm Photo Imaging Group marketing manager said: “We’re seeing that inkjet- dominated clouds still have very substantial silver linings. Despite the highly successful evolution of inkjet options, the 150 year-long tradition of silver halide paper still remains a first choice for many of today’s professional photographers who seek the ultimate in quality output.”

He added “The real challenge is simply to educate more photographers that silver halide exists and that it is a ‘peak of perfection’ product available right here, right now. The fact is that silver halide offers the highest print quality attainable right now from any medium. Additionally, photographers using papers such as Fujifilm Crystal Archive have the important security blanket of print longevity. Images printed by a good lab have archival permanence and boast supreme quality.”

Top photographers  like  multi-award-winning Edinburgh-based Trevor and Faye Yerbury and Newcastle-based Tim Wallace - who is widely acclaimed as one of the top ten most influential photographers in the world today – say they insist on their labs having the capacity to print their work  as C-Type prints.

                                       

 

Said Trevor Yerbury: “The inescapable fact is that our pictures look simply stunning when output on Fujifilm Crystal Archive. It’s a silver halide no-brainer for us          

                                        Tim Wallace added: “I’ve just had an exhibition of my recent work in Death Valley. It was Digitalab manager Jeff Heads who suggested we output the prints on Crystal Archive and I was delighted with the results – simply the very best quality output.”

Topics:
  • Photo Imaging